Brain Health,
Nutrition,
Smart Drugs,
23 MINS

#005: Gabe Lee’s DIY Nootropic Supplement "BrainStack"

January 03, 2013
MP3

In this week’s episode, Jesse talks with Gabe Lee, the co-creator of BrainStack – a non-prescription supplement combining several different nootropics. Lee discusses his story of how he became interested in nootropics, why and how he created his own, and how it works. Listeners who hang around until the end of the podcast will hear a particularly salacious Ruthless Listener Retention Gimmick about a “smart drug” you never thought of as a smart drug.  Or you can read about that study here.

Brain Optimization as a Personal Quest

Diagnosed with ADD at the ripe old age of his mid-twenties, Gabe Lee started down the path of trying to improve his own concentration and mental performance and how to maintain focus with the use of Adderall.  Lee describes his Adderall experiences and why – despite its short-term upsides – he felt the need to combat ADD in a way that avoided Adderall’s side effects… Eventually leading to the creation of his own self-designed nootropics “stack.”  Also in his overall productivity-hacking regimen, Lee discusses green tea and his practice of Intermittent Fasting for both health maintenance and daily efficiency.

Deciding on BrainStack’s Ingredients

“I was into taking different supplements…and I had a light bulb moment,” says Lee.  He describes his research and how he sought out chemical combinations that increased focus but wouldn’t create caffeine-style jitters. Lee says his research included a lot of work determining specific “sweet spot” dosages to give the effects desired without running the risks of side effects or overstimulation in sensitive BrainStack users.

This Week in Neuroscience: Oregano Oil Aids Brain Health

Better brain health could be as easy as raiding your spice cabinet. A clinical study detailed in the British Journal of Nutrition found that oregano oils can increase (or technically, prevent the decrease) of neurotransmitter levels related to concentration, relaxation, improved learning, and alertness. Read the full article here.

Key Terms Mentioned

 

10 comments

  1. Pam Vandeberghe says:

    I am so intrigued by this Gabe!! I am also so proud of you and your accomplishments. Mom has been in a nursing home for over a year now with Dementia. I am pretty sure I will get it too, so that’s another reason for my interest. Danny is prescribed Adderall and so is TJ. I hate that drug and wish it was never created. Thanks for what you are doing and the best of luck to you always!

  2. Paul R. says:

    I totally dismissed this product when I saw that it had GABA in it. GABA is totally useless in a supplement because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier.

    1. Jesse Lawler says:

      Interesting, a little Wikipedia research and you seem to be right. There are cases (not many) where GABA can sneak past “holes” in the blood-brain barrier, but the evidence for orally-administered GABA having therapeutically significant effects in the brain seems scanty. Thanks for posting.

  3. Paul R. says:

    I totally dismissed this product when I saw that it had GABA in it. GABA is totally useless in a supplement because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier.

    1. Jesse Lawler says:

      Interesting, a little Wikipedia research and you seem to be right. There are cases (not many) where GABA can sneak past “holes” in the blood-brain barrier, but the evidence for orally-administered GABA having therapeutically significant effects in the brain seems scanty. Thanks for posting.

  4. Nate says:

    Gaba has never had any positive effects for me.

  5. Jena says:

    Wanted to mention a small thing in this episode. Your interview mentioned eating raw eggs in a shake and you questioned whether that was good for you due to possible salmonella contamination and not eating raw cookie dough.
    I’m a nurse and wanted to clarify this. Fresh eggs do not have a high risk of containing bacteria, in fact in most countries other than the USA eggs are not even refrigerated.
    The risk of infection comes from handling the eggs themselves.
    Since the chicken has only 1 exit hole fecal matter often ends up on the egg shells. Manufacturers wash the eggs but sometimes residue is still left on the shell.
    It’s important to wash your hands after handling an egg to prevent infection, but there is little chance of disease from the egg itself, even when raw.
    If an egg had been contaminated with enough bacteria to make you sick it will almost always smell very bad when cracked.

    1. Jesse Lawler says:

      That is fantastic info Jena! Thank you so much. I knew about the “only one hole” thing with birds — but I didn’t realize that tied in with this old-school warning about eggs. 🙂

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